Governor Eric Holcomb signed 20 bills

INDIANAPOLIS – Governor Eric Holcomb signed 20 bills today.

You can view more details at the 2021 Bill Watch webpage.

Some of the bills signed today include:

Senate Bill 28, authored by Senators Rick Niemeyer,  James Tomes, and Eddie Melton. The bill was co-authored by Sen. Lonnie Randolph. The bill was sponsored by Representatives Harold Slager, Julie Olthoff, Mike Aylesworth, and Justin Moed.

The bill prohibits a person who is delinquent in the payment of personal property taxes or is subject to an existing personal property tax judgment from bidding on or purchasing a tract at a tax sale. Prohibits a business entity from bidding on or purchasing a tract at a tax sale when a person who is prohibited from bidding on or purchasing a tract at a tax sale: (1) formed the business entity; (2) joined with another person or party to form the business entity; (3) joined the business entity as a proprietor, incorporator, partner, shareholder, director, employee, or member; (4) becomes an agent, employee, or board member of the business entity; or (5) is not an attorney at law and represents the business entity in a legal matter.

Requires a person to acknowledge that providing false information relating to a prohibited bid or purchase is perjury and creates a new section of code with revised requirements for the forfeiture of a tax sale purchase by an ineligible bidder.

Requires a county treasurer, except for in a county containing a consolidated city, to pay all taxes and assessments that accrue on the tract of real estate through the time the record owner is divested of title from the tax sale surplus fund for the tract.

Permits a county legislative body to adopt an ordinance prohibiting the assignment of a certificate of sale prior to the issuance of a tax title deed.

Adds requirements that must be met within 150 days of the date a court grants a petition to issue a tax deed before a county auditor can issue or record a tax deed. 

Senate Bill 79 authored by Senators Michael Crider and. Michael Young. The bill was co-authored by Senators  Kyle Walker, Eric Bassler, Jack Sandlin, Greg Taylor, Sen. Mike Bohacek, Fady Qaddoura, and Lonnie Randolph. The bill was sponsored by Representatives Wendy McNamara, Sharon Negele, and Mike Speedy.

The bill provides that if a petition for an order for protection is filed by a person or on behalf of an unemancipated minor, the court shall determine, after reviewing the petition or making an inquiry, whether issuing the order for protection may impact a school corporation’s ability to provide in-person instruction for the person or the unemancipated minor.

The bill creates a procedure that requires a school corporation to receive notice if the court determines that issuing the order for protection may impact the school corporation’s ability to provide in-person instruction for the person or the unemancipated minor.

The bill also enhances the penalty for domestic battery to a Level 6 felony if the offense is committed against a family or household member: (1) who has been issued a protection order that protects the family or household member from the person and the protection order was in effect at the time the person committed the offense; or (2) while a no-contact order issued by the court directing the person to refrain from having any direct or indirect contact with the family or household member was in effect at the time the person committed the offense.

It also enhances the penalty for domestic battery to a Level 5 felony when the offender has a prior conviction for strangulation against the same family or household member

Senate Bill 167 authored by Senators Jack Sandlin and Aaron Freeman. The bill was co-authored by Senators Andy Zay, Mike Bohacek, David Niezgodski, and Chris Garten. The bill was sponsored by Representatives John Young, Michelle Davis, Justin Moed, and Mitch Gore.

The bill addressed the theft and sale of catalytic converters and valuable metals. The bill provides that the theft of a component part of a motor vehicle, including a catalytic converter, is a Level 6 felony. It also expands qualifying prior convictions for Level 6 felony theft to include robbery and burglary.

The bill provides that a valuable metal dealer who: (1) knowingly or intentionally fails to comply with certain statutes regulating the purchase of a valuable metal; and (2) purchases a stolen valuable metal; commits a Level 6 felony.

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